Founder John ”Jack” Bahrs, the grandson of a tall ship captain, and wife Florence, had their beginning in the Dutch Neck section of Newark where they owned and operated a small neck tie manufacturing business. The family was interested in Highlands and, after a robbery and their silk supply and finished neckties, they cemented their resolve to move to Highlands. They purchased a small boat rental business on Cedar Street that they operated in the summer and went back to work in Newark for the off-season. In 1917, they purchased the beached houseboat at this location, moved the rental boats over and started cooking up chowder. The rest is history! Jack, Florence and their four children, John(Bud), Al, Ken and Ruth, worked hard together selling bait, renting rowboats and cooking up dinners for fishing parties that would come down on the train Friday night and pay $2.50 for room and board. The two story houseboat had a potbelly stove and operated just seasonally. The houseboat structure remains as the interior of main dining room and reception area.

From the 1940s to the 1970s, Bud and his wife Peg successfully grew the business to a year-round destination entertaining seafood lovers visiting from Monmouth Park, the Garden State Arts Center, and the beaches. Famous stars such as Frank Sinatra, Joe DiMaggio and Ernest Borginine, and many more enjoyed lobster dinners at Bahrs. In the early days you could arrive by steamer or train when the Central Railroad of NJ came from Jersey City and stopped at Highland Station, just outside of Bahrs front door, on its way to Long Branch.

Bud & Peg officially retired in 1974. The Restaurant has been owned since by Ray Cosgrove and his son Jay, the fourth generation great grandson of the founders. Together they have expanded the facility to include Mobys Outside Deck & Lobster pound as well as the original marina facility. Our family and experienced dedicated staff have served over 12 million customers. Bahrs Landing is considered one of New Jersey’s famous landmarks as well as one of the country’s oldest family run restaurants.

Bahrs Landing specializes in catering to large and small groups, with friendly service, creating special memories for you and your family!

1917 Our History – Houseboat Beginnings

June 9, 1917

1917 Our History – Houseboat Beginnings

Founder John “Jack” Bahrs, born 1880, was the grandson of a ship captain. In 1910, he and his wife Florence(nee Crelin)lived on Walnut Street in the Dutch Neck section of Newark, N.J. with the Crelin family. John Bahrs and Brothers Necktie Factory was listed in the buyers guide of the New York Times in February of 1908 and was located at 313 Market Street. William K. Bahrs, born 1840, wrote that the business was “doing as good as could be expected in a year with a panic” referring to bank failures. However, in December of 1907 the necktie operation had been robbed of several bolts of silk and dozens of finished neckties. The robber, George “Humpty” Williams was caught and confessed to this and other area thefts. John tried to conduct the necktie business from home after the robbery. In 1913 Jack operated a boat rental business at the foot of Cedar Street in Highlands while his children played on the sandy banks of the Shrewsbury…

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The First Winter

December 19, 1917

The First Winter

As happens during cold snaps today, the first winter was not free from worry as ice sheets move through with the tides, threatening pilings in the marina. The old scow of the houseboat is visible and at this time the building probably lifted with very high tides. The south side of the building reads “Regular Bait for Regular Fishermen“.  Behind and to the right is Creighton’s Dancing Pavilion, (later to be Kruse’s) which featured an outdoor pavilion with orchestras for dancing and amusement pier where the excursion boats of the old Patten Line docked. The photo may have been taken from the foot-bridge of the train trestle that led over to Sandlass Beach. The area was a hub of activity as the Highlands train station, newspaper stand, trolley stop and taxi’s were all located here. Up the hill on Highland Avenue…

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Bahrs 1930’s

March 15, 1932

Bahrs 1930’s

Footpath Across the Drawbridge to Highlands  This undated photo(late 1920’s?) of Bahrs Landing has the $1 Dollar Shore Dinner advertised in paint on the side of the building. The building to the right is Highlands train station. The train tracks were only 30 feet from the restaurant door. The Central Railroad of NJ came from Jersey City and stopped, just outside of Bahrs, at Highlands station on its way to Long Branch. Prohibition came to and end nationally in 1933 and one of 25 retail liquor licenses in Highlands is issued to Jack Bahrs Sr. At this time son Buddy was 25 years old with blue eyes reported the registry of the crew of the vessel SS Manhattan.  In the off-season Buddy served elegant meals on this luxury steamship that made her maiden voyage in 1932. The ship plied from New York to Hamburg via Channel Ports. It was on the SS Manhattan that Buddy learned food, serving and hospitality in addition to developing an appreciation for all things maritime. Buddy is found on SS Manhattan crew lists for crossings on November 1933, December 1933, February 1934 and in March 1934. A one way trip…

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Chowder History

January 10, 1940

Chowder History

Clam Chowder is on the Bahrs Landing menu in 1929 but there was not an indication as to whether it is red tomato based or if it is milk based. Chowders in this area were typically the Down East type, that is, made of whole clams and the clam juice, with a dash of potato for flavor, although the customer who asked for milk or cream in his chowder may have had it. People that lived in Maine said “no” to tomato in chowder. People in Manhattan said “yes” to tomato and for years the name Coney Island Chowder stuck, until, someone decided that Manhattan Clam Chowder sounded better and then that name stuck for tomato based clam chowder. We found a note containing a recipe for Church Chowder 1940 from Hattie Walstrom to Ken Bahrs(envelope address typed to Ken although note is addressed to John). Hattie was an active member of the Highlands Methodist Church, as were the Bahrs family. Hattie was so regarded that she was known to take the pulpit when the reverend was out of town. In the…

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Fete for Gertrude Ederle

August 4, 1956

Fete for Gertrude Ederle

Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel in 1926, was feted at Bahrs Restaurant on August 4th 1956. Trudy spent her summers in Highlands where she trained in the challenging currents beneath the Highlands bridge. She swam 35 miles from Cape Griz Nez, France, to the south coast of England in 14 hours and 31 minutes. The event celebrated the 30th Anniversary of the Channel Swim and was covered in the society magazine Spotlight and in the local papers.

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Bahrs In The 1960’s

June 1, 1961

Bahrs In The 1960’s

The recipe for Bahr’s Special was published by the Ford Times (yep the car company) in May of 1966.  This publication was distributed to about 5 million people and the edition that Bahrs Landing was in, was titled “Famous Recipes from Famous Restaurants,” reason being that if you had a car you needed to know where to eat when you got there. The art for the piece on Bahrs Landing is by Howard Connelly. He painted, to accompany the recipe, a beautiful rendition of the lounge and dining area including the red leatherette bar chairs, the carved King Neptune, ship wheel and ship model. Peter Doremus, Ford sales manager of Mount-English, Red Bank, presented the original watercolor to Bud and Peg. Bud was Mayor of Highlands at this time. The Garden State Arts Center and Monmouth Park attracted crowds and celebrities. Long time Courier News reporter Muriel Smith wrote on August 19th 1967 of a visit to Bahrs Restaurant by Ernest Borgnine, Academy Award winner, star of television’s “McHales Navy” and a star attraction in the cast of “The Dirty Dozen”, a World War II movie which premiered in New York…

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Bud & Peg Bahrs

August 19, 1969

Bud & Peg Bahrs

Bud and Peg did a spot on the Joe Franklin Show in the early 1950’s. Joe Franklin had moved to television from radio. He was a pioneer in promoting products such as Hoffman beverages and Canada Dry ginger ale on the air. The writing on the photo reads “Thanks for sparkling on TV, Bud and Peggy. Loved honoring Bahrs for Canada Dry. Howdy Earl and Joe Franklin. P.S. See you in Highlands.” A large lobster…

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Bahrs During The 1980’s

June 1, 1980

Bahrs During The 1980’s

Bud and Peg officially retired in 1974. The Restaurant has been owned by Ray Cosgrove with his son Jay, the 4th generation great grandson of the founders. Together they have expanded the facility to include Mobys Outside Deck & Lobster pound as well as the original marina facility. The family and experienced dedicated staff have served more than 12 million customers. Bahrs Landing is considered one of New Jersey’s famous landmarks and one of the country’s oldest family run restaurants.  

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Restaurant acquires model ship collection

January 9, 2011

Restaurant acquires model ship collection

Bahrs Landing is home to ship model builder Henry Schaefer’s collection of 33 museum quality ship models. Schaefer ran a nautical antique business in Atlantic Highlands but had been making detailed models of ships since he was a young kid. When Schaefer was in his eighties, he wanted to find a place for his prized models to stay together…

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Super Storm Sandy Photos

October 31, 2012

Super Storm Sandy Photos

       

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Bahrs Landing Celebrating 100 Years

December 18, 2016

Bahrs Landing Celebrating 100 Years

JAKBAR and STARBOUND

January 19, 2017

JAKBAR and STARBOUND

In photo above, next to the JAKBAR, the famous 65′ sloop, “Starbound” was being framed, at Bahrs Pier 7 during the years of 1946 through 1948. Built for Nutley NJ engineer J. Kenneth Whitteker, who after becoming fascinated with sailing, began researching the Spray, Joshua Slocum’s famed sloop. Determined to have one just like her, William J. Deed, New York Naval architect was commissioned to draw the plans and the Bahrs boatyard at Pier 7 was to build her. The Newark Sunday News printed a large story on the event featuring ten large photos, eight of them taken of the construction at Bahrs Pier 7. The carpenters working on the Spray were some of the most skilled artisans in the business. Some of their names were George Fay, Karl Kristensen, John Kristensen, and Olaf Olsen. Ken Bahrs was foreman in charge of the yard. The lumber of the 300 pound stern was of white oak, cut in Lakewood, NJ. The Starbound went to sail around the world twice by her owners the Gordon & Nina Stuermer who went on to write popular cruising books including one named “Starbound.” In the early days of Bahrs Landing, fishing boats left out of…

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